10Apr
2016
0

Bonobos can remember past group members

We all sing don’t we? We sing at school, at work, at home and in the bath too. Now scientists have realised that some monkeys also sing.


When it was a familiar voice in the recording, the bonobos became excited and would search for the individual, while the animals gave little reaction to hearing the calls of bonobos they had never known.GORILLAS ‘HUM’ FOR THEIR SUPPER They are the biggest primates on the planet, yet despite their imposing strength and size, gorillas can often display surprising moments of tenderness.Now new research has revealed the male giant apes, well known for their booming chest beating roars, have another gentler side to them – they like to sing.Biologists have found wild western lowland gorillas producing tuneful calls and deep hums while eating various different food types, perhaps as a sign of contentment.Adult males, including the dominant silverbacks, sing far more than females or juveniles, producing deep vibrating calls, making them the tenors of the forest. The team concluded that the primates are therefore capable of remembering the voice of a former group member, even after five years of separation.Sumir Keenan, of the School of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of St Andrews, said: ‘Members of a bonobo community separate regularly into small groups for hours or even days and often use loud calls to communicate with one another. ‘Moreover, females leave their original community but may continue to interact with their old companions in subsequent meetings between communities.

Source: Bonobos can remember past group members even if they’ve been separated for years | Daily Mail Online